Tiger & Bunny: All’s Well That Ends Well (The Consulting Analyst)

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This series is made possible by a commission from Frank Hecker. You can find out more about commissions here. 

Intro

All’s Well That Ends Well.

“if the outcome of a situation is happy, this compensates for any previous difficulty or unpleasantness.”

Origin: possibly in the middle ages, with Shakespeare’s play of the same name.

While Kotetsu’s life just about hit rock bottom in this episode, it ended with him meeting the man who’d save his life.

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Queer Horror Podcast SPINES is a Promising Debut for New Studio

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This essay was commissioned by @UncleAsriel. You can find out more about commissions here.

Watching a new group of artists set out together is a gamble: you look at the strengths they’re already beginning to display, the issues they’re working out how to overcome, and lay your bets as to where they’ll end up in a month, or a year, or ten. Zoom Doom Stories, who just completed their debut podcast Spines, has put an impressively strong foot forward with a mission statement to make “dark, creepy, queer, feminist podcasts.” Sign me up.

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The Consulting Analyst – An Introduction to Tiger & Bunny

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This series is made possible by a commission from Frank Hecker. You can find out more about commissions here. 

In the city of Sternbild, heroes are a part of everyday life. In fact, the superpowered beings called NEXT are reality TV superstars, wearing sponsor logos and competing for points as they carry out their work. Kotetsu T. Kaburagi, AKA Wild Tiger, is one such hero. Now considered “past his prime,” his career takes a turn when he’s paired with the haughty rookie Barnaby Brooks Jr.—a young man dead set on finding his parents’ killer.

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Vampire Princess Miyu: We Need More Shoujo Horror

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This essay was commissioned by Shawn. You can find out more about commissions here. 

Horror anime is rare and rarely affecting. Series often have difficulty conveying or maintaining unsettling atmospheres and slow burns, and turn instead to gore and body horror—subgenres that can be quite effective but can easily take a turn for the silly.

It’s why series that can act with at least a certain amount of restraint have stuck in the anime fandom’s collective memory: the tragic Nina from Fullmetal Alchemist, Higurashi’s carefully spaced explosions of violence, and Tetsuo’s slow loss of bodily autonomy in AKIRA. Older anime fans in particular might add one more name to that set: Vampire Princess Miyu, a rare horror series both targeted toward and starring women.

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As Above, So Below and the Purpose of Found Footage

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This essay was commissioned by abby-something. Want me to write about something you find interesting? You can find out more about commissions here

A guy walks into a studio. “I have a great idea,” he says. “The Parisian catacombs are spooky, right? How come nobody’s ever shot a horror movie down there?” The film that resulted was 2014’s As Above, So Below.

I can see you itching your palms already. Unfortunately, you failed to take into account this monkey’s paw behind my back and its two stipulations: the director is John Erick Dowdle, whose previous film was the illustrious M Night Shyamalan brainchild Devil, and the specific horror subgenre is everyone’s favorite gimmick genre, “found footage.”

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“Those Poor People:” Penny Dreadful’s Secondhand Approach to Marginalization

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This essay was commissioned by May Walsh, who requested an essay about Penny Dreadful season 1. You can learn more about commissions here

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: a young woman buys a house. It is haunted, perhaps by a ghost or only by the heavy guilt and terrible misdeeds of those who came before; the difference is ultimately inconsequential, as the prose has already wrapped its way around you and started strangling. That’s gothic fiction. Of course, the misdeeds might just as well be crimes of existing while queer or mentally ill, depending on the author. Gothic fiction is a genre preoccupied with looking at the “other:” other than male, other than white, or straight, or able-bodied—and finding them frightening.

Over time those parameters began to involve. Those who were defined as Other began to make their own entries into the genre. It became a place where writers could depict characters like themselves, whether that meant being able to push against their accepted societal roles or being allowed to exist at all. As long as it ended in a neat cap that reassured the audience that proper order could be restored, any number of things were possible in the meanwhile.

Crossing the genre over with the concept of fanfiction seems a natural fit, given that fanfiction (at least in its modern incarnation) also sprang from women, queer folk, and other marginalized identities looking to write themselves into texts that excluded them. And so we have Penny Dreadful, a show gleefully intent on elbowing you in the ribs with its references while also solemnly assuring you that it has something to say. While the first season frames its plot through a discussion of women and the various ways in which they’re abused, it’s muddled by clumsy execution.

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10 Underrated Performances (Part 1)

This essay was commissioned by Chris Spiderdreamer. You can find out more about commissions here.

Just in time for Oscar season: yet more people who have never been acknowledged by the archaic, garbage voting body that defines the public perception of Doing Entertainment Good. “Underrated” can mean just about infinite things to infinite people, and nearly as many even from a single point of view. Do you go with roles acclaimed in their time but lost to history? Small roles that get overlooked after the fact? Exceptional performances based on an actor’s history or usual type of performance? We could all be here for months exploring the possibilities.

Faced with that wealth of options, I wound up dividing this post into two different approaches. This week, we’ll look at a few performances so good they make the work worth seeing, even if the overall result is an uneven one. One really good actor, given enough space, can elevate an entire project – there are B-movie actors who make a career of it. I could’ve populated the entire list with picks from Cillian Murphy’s CV (I didn’t, but he still deserves a mention).

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